First Day of School at the University of Bologna!!!!!!!

just testing

Ok. So maybe the second time around is better. Right? I just wrote this beautiful entry and then lost it some how. So, sorry for my poor salutatio, because I have to express my frustration first with technology.
So, then, let me begin. This morning we had a great breakfast, coffee Americano and croissants and nutkao-for me. Set my day up right. And then we walked over to the University of Bologna together. When we got to the classroom it was on the ground floor and it opened onto a beautiful courtyard, with a well and some great modern paintings. The professors were four women who couldn’t be nicer and friendlier. We had an excellent instruction by Prof. Mueller and learned about the connection of medieval writing theory and its impact on modern digital writing. For me, I was thinking “Who would have thought?” But, through the course of the morning, I could see the connection between ancient writing theory and how we correspond with one another today.
After our lunch period, we took a tour of the center of Bologna: the Piazza Maggiore. It has a major T.V. screen for a huge audience, a famous statue of Neptune, and a cobbled plaza. We first went to the Town Hall and saw some great pieces of art work. Afterwards we went to three different churches. The first was the San Petrino in the Bologna square. I had to change and put a cover-up sun dress on in order to enter the church. They seemed strict and allowed absolutely no photography. The church was an active place and one of the professors explained to me that every Sunday it was busy and that was also were they celebrated events for the city. Following this, we went to the friar’s church of San Domingo next to our dorms and were able to see a preserved German saint’s body. We also saw St. Domingo’s skull preserved in a glass tomb in a part of the church that was too sacred to take pictures in. The last church we visited was St. Viale e Agricola which was an old fashioned, medieval church. This had many nooks and crannies and many of us on the trip noticed the scents wafting from these little rooms. Some said “talcum powder” some “flowers” and yet again “old wood.” One of the professors told me that for a time people falsely believed that St. Peter was buried there. We went to visit a fourth church but it was closed for the day.
What an incredible learning experience today. I can’t say enough of the knowledgebility of Paolo, our guide, and the other professors. They were so kind and helpful that it was so enjoyable. Later that night we went out to eat as a group, al fresco and I for one had the famous Tataglione Bolognese. It was a fabulous and busy day. I learned a lot and am amazed at the historical richness of the city!just testing

Ok. So maybe the second time around is better. Right? I just wrote this beautiful entry and then lost it some how. So, sorry for my poor salutatio, because I have to express my frustration first with technology.
So, then, let me begin. This morning we had a great breakfast, coffee Americano and croissants and nutkao-for me. Set my day up right. And then we walked over to the University of Bologna together. When we got to the classroom it was on the ground floor and it opened onto a beautiful courtyard, with a well and some great modern paintings. The professors were four women who couldn’t be nicer and friendlier. We had an excellent instruction by Prof. Mueller and learned about the connection of medieval writing theory and its impact on modern digital writing. For me, I was thinking “Who would have thought?” But, through the course of the morning, I could see the connection between ancient writing theory and how we correspond with one another today.
After our lunch period, we took a tour of the center of Bologna: the Piazza Maggiore. It has a major T.V. screen for a huge audience, a famous statue of Neptune, and a cobbled plaza. We first went to the Town Hall and saw some great pieces of art work. Afterwards we went to three different churches. The first was the San Petrino in the Bologna square. I had to change and put a cover-up sun dress on in order to enter the church. They seemed strict and allowed absolutely no photography. The church was an active place and one of the professors explained to me that every Sunday it was busy and that was also were they celebrated events for the city. Following this, we went to the friar’s church of San Domingo next to our dorms and were able to see a preserved German saint’s body. We also saw St. Domingo’s skull preserved in a glass tomb in a part of the church that was too sacred to take pictures in. The last church we visited was St. Viale e Agricola which was an old fashioned, medieval church. This had many nooks and crannies and many of us on the trip noticed the scents wafting from these little rooms. Some said “talcum powder” some “flowers” and yet again “old wood.” One of the professors told me that for a time people falsely believed that St. Peter was buried there. We went to visit a fourth church but it was closed for the day.
What an incredible learning experience today. I can’t say enough of the knowledgebility of Paolo, our guide, and the other professors. They were so kind and helpful that it was so enjoyable. Later that night we went out to eat as a group, al fresco and I for one had the famous Tataglione Bolognese. It was a fabulous and busy day. I learned a lot and am amazed at the historical richness of the city!

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